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Northwestern Buffett Institute for Global Affairs

Global Campus Collaborative Grant Recipients

In response to the novel coronavirus pandemic and resulting travel restrictions, Northwestern Buffett has partnered with the Office of the Vice President for International Relations to offer new funding opportunities to support faculty members’ creative online international teaching and research efforts during the 2020-21 academic year. These grants invite faculty to build a Global Campus Collaborative program, which leverages the university’s international partnerships and involve teaching, research, and collaboration.  Learn more about the Global Campus Collaborative recipients below:

 

International Classroom Partnering

Rifka Cook 

Rifka Cook 

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

This coming spring quarter, Rifka Cook will connect her “Spanish 121-3, Special Topic: Gastronomy and Identity” students with peers from Universidad Torcuato Di Tella in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to practice their second language skills. Throughout the course, both student groups will participate in language exchange and interviews centered around identity, lifestyles, and cultural and culinary traditions. Cook intends for this collaboration to strengthen her students’ Spanish language skills while simultaneously increasing their global awareness and cultural knowledge. 

“My teaching is designed to ensure that students are equipped to use the foreign language not only professionally but also as a way to reflect on their own culture and others’,” said Cook, Associate Professor of Spanish in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, who expects 16 students to participate from each university. 

Lina Deng

Lina Deng

School of Education and Social Policy

This fall, through a SESP collaboration with Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management, students from both institutions are working together to develop an inclusive global workplace plan for a multinational corporation. Students in SESP’s Masters of Science in Learning and Organizational Change (MSLOC) program “are preparing for careers as change leaders and practitioners who must design and implement solutions in a variety of organizations,” explained Lina Deng, Assistant Professor of Instruction in Northwestern's School of Education and Social Policy and co-instructor of the “Leading Global Change” course. 

In addition to conducting country-level cultural analyses, participating in cross-cultural virtual collaborations, and delving into global case studies, students will have access to guest speakers, including a faculty member from Peking University and the CEO of Fuyao Glass USA, Jeff Liu, whose company is used as a case study for the course.  

Thomas F. Geraghty

Thomas F. Geraghty

Pritzker School of Law

A classroom partnership between Addis Ababa University Law School (AAU Law) in Ethiopia and Northwestern Pritzker School of Law’s Center for International Human Rights will explore issues surrounding international access to justice. Building upon a 50-year relationship between the two universities, this newly designed law course will examine the development and support of civil and criminal legal aid programs in the United States, Ethiopia, and Somalia. 

Throughout the term, teams of Northwestern law students will collaborate with faculty and students in Ethiopia and Somalia to examine legal aid development in the targeted countries and determine if programs measure up to domestic and international standards. “Students will then jointly formulate recommendations for the continuing support and improvement of legal aid programs in those countries,” said Thomas F. Geraghty, Interim Director for Pritzker's Center for International Human Rights.

A unique twist on this collaboration is that Mizanie Abate, Associate Dean and Director of Research at AAU Law, will be in residence at Northwestern beginning in January 2021 as a Fulbright Scholar and participate in the course.

Licheng Gu

Licheng Gu

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Wen-pin Hsieh

Wen-pin Hsieh

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

In Spring 2021, undergraduate students in the intermediate Chinese language class 121-3 will be paired with students from National Tsing Hua University's Global Program in Taiwan, which enrolls students interested in global engagement and leadership. Wen-pin Hsieh, Assistant Professor of Instruction, and Coordinator of the Chinese Language Program, and Licheng Gu, Professor of Instruction — both from Northwestern’s Department of Asian Languages and Cultures — will co-teach the course, which has been adapted to allow students to collaborate synchronously despite the 13-hour time difference.

“Culturally differentiated attitudes toward education and family will be the theme of peer discussion and joint class projects,” said Hsieh. These will be complemented by an NTHU faculty member’s guest lecture comparing U.S. and Taiwanese perspectives on academic achievement and its impact on family relationships and society.

The course will culminate in a joint capstone project, presented in English and Chinese, in which students will provide their shared perspectives on how cultural values regarding personal development and academic achievement differ in Taiwan and the U.S.

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

This winter quarter, Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, Professor of Political Science and the Crown Chair in Middle East Studies, will work with colleagues at Sciences Po in Paris and the Graduate Institute in Geneva, Switzerland to teach graduate students how to build and maintain effective international research networks in the social sciences. The topic of discussion of this network will be the politics of religion and race in transnational perspective.

“These are important skills that are rarely discussed in graduate training,” said Hurd, who recently hosted a joint online webinar with the Graduate Institute and Sciences Po. She found that working virtually with her colleagues supports her ongoing collaborations with the International Research Network on Contextualizing Radicalization: The Politics of Violent Extremism and significantly enhances her students’ experiences and scholarly connections. Hurd will implement her grant activities through her graduate seminar, “Religion, Race, and Politics: Global and Imperial Perspectives.”

Kimberly Pusateri

Kimberly Pusateri

Communication Studies

This fall, students are deepening their understanding of global health communication and leadership decision making through a new collaboration with the National University of Singapore (NUS). Kimberly Pusateri, a Lecturer in the Department of Communication Studies and Associate Director of the Master of Science Health Communication program, worked with NUS colleague Ningxin Wang to create a four-week workshop designed to help their students — together and through their different cultural lenses — analyze decisions made by global leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“Students studying decision-making and uncertainty in Singapore will collaborate and share expertise with students studying health communication in the United States,” Pusateri explained. Throughout the workshop, students are guided to share specific concepts learned in their areas of study and tackle activities that merge the two disciplinary fields. 

Alessia Ricciardi

Alessia Ricciardi

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Longtime collaborators Isabelle Alfandary of Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3 and Northwestern’s Alessia Ricciardi, Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature and Director of the Program of Comparative Literary Studies, plan to use their classroom partnering grant to switch gears this academic year. In Winter 2021, Alfandary and Ricciardi will supplement their jointly organized annual Summer Institute of Psychoanalysis with a co-taught graduate seminar on Literature and Philosophy, emphasizing the works of Derrida and Agamben. The Summer Institute, with its focus on advancing global discussions of the relationship between psychoanalysis and culture, attracted students from around the world in 2018 and 2019, but was canceled in summer 2020 due to the pandemic.

In an effort to continue existing collaborations and provide students with an international and interdisciplinary learning experience similar to the one offered through the Summer Institute, Ricciardi plans to use her co-teaching opportunity with Alfandary to “offer students access to as many international scholarly opportunities as possible.” 

Virtual International Visitors

Masi Asare

Masi Asare

School of Communication

This international Visitor Grant was awarded to Masi Asare (Assistant Professor, Performance Studies, Theatre, Northwestern University) in order to facilitate a virtual campus visit by Vishal Bhardwaj.

Vishal Bhardwaj
Vishal Bhardwaj
Vishal Bhardwaj is a major figure in Bollywood cinema and the arts and culture sector in India more broadly. A film director, screenwriter and producer, his creative expertise also extends to work as a music composer and vocalist creating evocative scores for his own films as well as those of other leading artists, and for the theatre. Bhardwaj has directed 10 feature films, produced five, and composed music for more than 40. With a string of box office hits to his name, his work has achieved broad popular and commercial success as well as critical plaudits. The consummate artist-intellectual, Bhardwaj is known for adapting literary works into unexpected social and linguistic contexts, displaying a unique finesse with local dialects in his screenplays. He is the composer of the stage musical of Mira Nair’s Monsoon Wedding, with lyrics by Masi Asare, slated to tour India, Dubai, Singapore, and London when theatres reopen.

Vishal Bhardwaj’s visit is being organized in consultation with faculty across multiple academic disciplines at Northwestern.  This virtual visit will enable Bhardwaj to connect with students and faculty in the departments of Theatre, Radio/Television/Film, and Asian Languages and Cultures in the spring of 2021. The visit will include three major components: A musical theatre master class, where students will perform songs from Monsoon Wedding composed by Bhardwaj and receive direct feedback and coaching; individual virtual classroom visits with courses that engage with topics related to South Asian arts and culture; and finally a film screening and public Q&A, which will also include a panel of NU faculty who will respond to the film and engage in dialogue with the filmmaker.

Thomas Geraghty

Thomas Geraghty

Pritzker School of Law

This international Visitor Grant was awarded to Thomas Geraghty (Class of 1967 James B. Haddad Professor of Law; Former Associate Dean for Clinical Legal Education and Director of the Bluhm Legal Clinic, Northwestern University School of Law) to facilitate a virtual campus visit by Mumbi Ngugi.

Mumbi Ngugi

mumbi-1.jpgJustice Mumbi Ngugi is a Judge who serves in the Anticorruption and Economic Crimes Division of the High Court of Kenya. Ngugi is a long-term advocate for the human rights of women and children, housing rights of the urban poor, and rights of persons with albinism in Kenya. For the past nine years, Ngugi has been involved in the emerging human rights jurisprudence, ensuring courts uphold the socio-economic human rights guaranteed in Kenya’s constitution. Justice Ngugi holds a Bachelor of Laws Degree (LLB) from the University of Nairobi and a Master of Laws (LLM) in Commercial and Corporate Law from the London School of Economics, University of London. Before her appointment to the Bench, Ngugi was a prolific writer and researcher on human rights, working as a columnist focused on social and legal issues for some of Kenya’s leading newspapers.  She was also engaged in private practice for civil litigation and family law and was the Presiding Judge in the High Court of Kenya at Kericho and in the Constitutional and Human Rights Division in Nairobi.

In February 2021, Justice Ngugi will receive the Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law’s Center for International Human Rights’ Global Jurist of the Year award. Ngugi’s visit will include a webinar on February 21, 2021, which will be open to all members of the Northwestern community and to the broader public. At the virtual ceremony, Judge Ann Williams (7th Cir. Ret.), will interview Ngugi about her life-long commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion.

Wen-pin Hsieh

Wen-pin Hsieh

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

This international Visitor Grant was awarded to Wen-pin Hsieh (Assistant Professor of Instruction, Department of Asian Languages & Cultures, Northwestern University) to facilitate a virtual campus visit by Pei-Chih Lin.

Pei-Chih Lin

pei-chih-lin.pngDr. Lin is a leader in the internationalization of higher education and a researcher in communications. She has extensive international experience studying and teaching in Taiwan, the U.S., and Japan. Her research interests range from intercultural communication, interpersonal communication to university adjustment and higher education fundraising. At National Tsing-Hua University (NTHU), a top-tier STEM-focused institution, she serves as the mentor of the school’s International Bachelor’s Program and leads the Global Program (residential college). In these capacities, she teaches cross-cultural communication to international and Taiwanese undergraduates, supports them for enhanced global and local engagement, and coordinates cultural exchange and intercultural leadership programs.

Dr. Lin’s visit will include two lectures on the diversity of worldviews with a focus on cross-cultural family relationships and distinctions in communication styles. One will be dedicated to the Chinese language students participating in the International Classroom Partnering project of the Dept. of Asian Languages & Cultures, and the other for other members within DALC. In addition, she will give a talk for the International Studies Residential College (ISRC) on the theories and practices of NTHU’s Global Program. Another event will be in partnership with SESP and will most likely focus on a higher education fundraising strategy that NTHU has been employing in recent years in Asia.

So Hye Kim

So Hye Kim

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

This international Visitor Grant was awarded to So Hye Kim (Postdoctoral Weinberg Fellow, Northwestern University) to facilitate a virtual campus visit by Sangwoo Kang.

Sangwoo Kang

sangwoo-kang.jpgSangwoo Kang is an independent filmmaker from South Korea. Kang’s film, Kim-Gun, also known as Mr. Kim, was one of the most important Korean films of 2019. Kim-Gun is a documentary that centers on the identity of a young man from a photograph taken during the 1980 Gwangju Democratic Uprising, which was part of a larger nationwide democratization movement in the 1980s in South Korea. Kang engaged in a vigorous search to find this young man’s identity and to resolve the ongoing controversy over the Gwangju Uprising. Focusing on politically contentious subjects, Kang’s film plays a pivotal role in the field of mnemonics and the social memories of contemporary South Korea.

Sangwoo Kang’s visit will enable him to connect with students and faculty in the Northwestern departments of Asian Languages & Cultures and Radio/Television/Film. The visit will consist of a film-screening and subsequent discussion open to all students, faculty and staff at Northwestern; and will be followed by a guest lecture specifically for students studying Korean Cinema. These events will explore the intersections between Kang’s work and South Korean society, as well as methodologies in documentary filmmaking.

David Tolchinsky

David Tolchinsky

School of Communication

This international Visitor Grant was awarded to David Tolchinsky (Professor; Founding Director & Co-Director, Northwestern University’s MFA in Writing for Screen and Stage program) in order to facilitate a virtual campus visit by Oladipo Agboluaje.

Oladipo Agboluaje

Oladipo Agboluaje is a prominent British-Nigerian playwright whose work interrogates the notions of home, identity, diaspora, nationalism and culture. Agboluaje is a recipient of the Alfred Fagon Prize in playwriting, which is awarded to the “Best New Play of the Year” by a Black British playwright and was also recently nominated for an Olivier Award for his play, Iya-lle (The First Wife). Last year, Agboluaje was a writer in residence at The National Theater and is currently a Royal Literary Fellow at The University of East London. His plays have been produced at some of the most prestigious theaters in England, including Soho Theatre, Arcola Theatre, Oval House Theatre, Unicorn Theatre, West Yorkshire Playhouse, and South Street Art Center. He received his BA from the University of Benin, his M.A. in Literature from Metropolitan University in London, and his PhD from The Open University.

In partnership with Northwestern University’s MFA in Writing for Screen and Stage program, Agboluaje will be virtually welcomed to campus this spring for a series of public and private events.  This will include a virtual public event featuring excerpts read from Agboluaje’s plays followed by a moderated Q&A session with faculty from Northwestern’s MFA in Writing for the Screen and Stage Program, as well as a moderated conversation with MFA Writing for the Screen and Stage Program Co-Director David Tolchinksy.

William West

William West

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Two international Visitor Grants were awarded to William West (Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literary Studies, Northwestern University) in order to facilitate a virtual campus visits by Elizabeth Rodini and Sophie Lemercier-Goddard.

Elizabeth Rodini
Elizabeth RodiniElizabeth Rodini is Andrew Heiskell Director of Arts at the American Academy in Rome.  Before assuming her position in Rome, she taught at Johns Hopkins University, where she founded the program in Museums and Society, as well as other universities.  Her work joins scholarship in the history of art, curatorial practice, and museology.  Her current research interests center on narratives of material heritage: the objects we protect and preserve, the stories we tell about them, and the way those stories get shared.

On Thursday, December 3rd at 4 PM CT, Elizabeth Rodini will present “There and Back Again: Tracking Gentile Bellin’s Portrait of Sultan Mehmed II.” This presentation will explore the complex, multiply entangled journey of this renowned Renaissance picture, raising a number of historiographical challenges and opportunities.  Moving from 1480 to the present, Rodini will follow the portrait across time and space, paying particular attention to matters of uncertainty, absence, and loss.

Rodini will also present “Itinerant Objects: Early Modern Mobility and the Spaces In Between” on Tuesday, December 28th at 4 PM CT.  Centering on objects that moved into and through Venice in the early modern period, this workshop queries the ways we think and talk about mobility, historically and in the present. Rodini proposes both mobility and distance as vectors of meaning, and invites conversation about how to explore the resulting questions in practices of research, writing, and museum display.

Sophie Lemercier-Goddard
Sophie Lemercier-GoddardSophie Lemercier-Goddard is Maîtresse des Conférences (Associate Professor) at the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, specializing in early modern European literature and the literatures of Britain. Much of her research is on travel writing from the early modern period, as Europeans encountered not only unfamiliar peoples, but unfamiliar landscapes like the arctic. Her work thus combines studies of cultural contact with environmental studies, tracing how European travelers and explorers responded to the particular intersections of person and place that emerged in these zones of contact.

Dr. Lemercier-Goddard will present some of her work in a remote public lecture on early modern climate and travel, discussing the challenges Europeans faced in translating a novel environment from local sources and to each other.  She will also focus on the layers of contacts that went into developing descriptions of weather, food and environment both for readers who might experience them vicariously at home, and those who might expect to meet them themselves.

Virtual Research Initiatives

Pablo Boczkowski

Pablo Boczkowski

School of Communication

This Virtual Research Grant was awarded to Pablo J. Boczkowski, who is the Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, Founder and Director of the Center for Latinx Digital Media, and Faculty Director of the Master of Science in Leadership for Creative Enterprises program at Northwestern. 

This grant supports a two-part research project organized by the Center for Latinx Digital Media. The first portion of this project involves the production of a series of thirty public outreach academic profiles portraying and highlighting the intellectual journeys, research agendas, and career advice from prominent Latinx and Latin American scholars examining digital media across the Americas. Once that process is completed, the second phase of the project will compile these profiles into an online booklet, published in English and translated into Spanish.

The project is led by Pablo Boczkowski and executed by third-year doctoral student Mora Matassi (both at the Department of Communication Studies at Northwestern University) from December 2020 until August 2021. It will consist of virtual collaborations with thirty researchers from around the world. This project is part of the broader infrastructure of the Center for Latinx Digital Media.

Tracy Davis

Tracy Davis

Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

This Virtual Research Grant was awarded to Tracy C. Davis, who is the Barber Professor of Performing Arts and Professor of Theatre and English at Northwestern.  

This grant will support a new consortium of six universities (Cologne, Ghana, Jawaharlal Nehru, Northwestern, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and Tel Aviv) who have partnered to create [six!].  They are co-hosting a workshop for graduate students in theatre November 2020 through May 2021. Graduate students will have the opportunity to build a global community of theatre scholars and a foundation for further study and collaborations. This 12-session workshop will focus on international festivals: their goals, what kinds of cultural work they do, and what goes into creating them. Over the workshop period, students will:

  • Learn about the history, controversies, and stakeholders that shape festivals.
  • Curate an online “festival” for the workshop by collaborating across institutions to propose works from each country that participants will view online and discuss together.
  • Co-author a multilingual blog and possibly other writing for publication. 

In addition to viewing performances, participants will have opportunities to share research-in-progress, learn about pedagogy in different institutional contexts, and become more globally-aware and globally-active scholars, now and in the future. 

Matthew Grayson

Matthew Grayson

McCormick School of Engineering

This virtual Research Initiative was awarded to Northwestern Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Professor Matthew Grayson, and project co-leads Guillermo Ameer (Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern) and Grant Theron (Molecular Biology, Stellenbosch University). 

This international research effort will connect a swab design recently developed at Northwestern University with medical testing research on both the COVID-19 virus and tuberculosis bacteria at Stellenbosch University in South Africa.  The novel swab has a detachable gauze-based tip which can be used as either an anterior nasal swab or a tongue swab for diagnostic sample collection.  The high surface area-to-volume ratio promises to make this swab competitive with other swabs currently in circulation, and the detachable soft gauze tip will eliminate the troublesome broken stem found in standard swabs and therefore allow automated pipetting to achieve massive-scale parallel-processed diagnostics.  The simple design allows for either manual or automated assembly and puts material costs at less than a penny-per-swab.  Thus, it is hoped that this collaboration can impact public health worldwide by reducing costs for pandemic diagnostics in developing economies.  Paired with other low-cost diagnostic tools, weekly testing of entire asymptomatic populations should become possible.