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Northwestern Buffett Institute for Global Affairs

Faculty Fellows

Current Northwestern Buffett Faculty Fellows

Faculty Fellows are full-time, tenure-line Northwestern faculty who provide thought leadership for the development of sustained research excellence and global engagement at Northwestern Buffett.

Karen Alter

Karen Alter

Lady Board of Managers of the Colombian Exposition Professor of Political Science and Law, Department of Political Science, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Contact: kalter@northwestern.edu

Current Research: Global Capitalism and Law; Backlash and the Contested Authority of International Law

Research Interests: Multilateralism; International Law; International Courts; Politics of Human Rights; Law and Politics

Karen J. Alter is an expert in international relations and international law. She is the author or editor of six books and over fifty articles and book chapters. Her interests span international relations, multilateralism, the law and politics of international courts, international regime complexity, global ethics and global capitalism and law. Her award-winning book The New Terrain of International Law: Courts, Politics, Rights (Princeton University Press, 2014) provides a framework for comparing and understanding the influence of the twenty-four international courts, and for conceptualizing how different domains of domestic and international politics are transformed through the creation of international courts.

Jordan Gans-Morse

Jordan Gans-Morse

Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Contact: jordan.gans-morse@northwestern.edu

Current Research: To Steal or To Serve? Motivations for Public Service in Corrupt States

Research Interests: Property Rights; Rule of Law; Authoritarian Institutions; Informal Institutions; Predatory States; Corruption; Clientelism

Jordan Gans-Morse conducts research on corruption, the rule of law, property rights, and political and economic transitions. Although his primary regional expertise is the former Soviet Union, he also has conducted research on Central-Eastern Europe and Latin America. He is the author of Property Rights in Post-Soviet Russia: Violence, Corruption, and Demand for Law (Cambridge University Press). During the 2016-2017 academic year, Gans-Morse served as a Fulbright Scholar teaching and conducting research in Ukraine.

William Hurst

William Hurst

Professor, Department of Political Science, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Contact: william.hurst@northwestern.edu

Current Research: Politics of legal institutions in both China and Indonesia

Research Interests: Law and Politics; Comparative Politics

William Hurst works on labor politics, contentious politics, political economy, and the politics of law and legal institutions, principally in China and Indonesia. He is the author of The Chinese Worker after Socialism (Cambridge) and co-editor of Laid-off Workers in a Workers’ State: Unemployment with Chinese Characteristics (Palgrave-MacMillan) and has published numerous articles and book chapters. For this work he has completed more than one year of fieldwork in each country since 2006. Before coming to Northwestern in 2013, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Oxford and an assistant professor at the Universities of Texas and Toronto.

Rajeev Kinra

Rajeev Kinra

Associate Professor, Department of History, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Contact: r-kinra@northwestern.edu

Current Research: His recent book, Writing Self, Writing Empire: Chandar Bhan Brahman and the Cultural World of the Indo-Persian State Secretary, addresses the life, Persian writings, and cultural-historical milieu of the celebrated Mughal state secretary and poet, Chandar Bhan “Brahman” (d. ~1670).

Research Interests: South Asian and Global History; Religious History; Comparative Literary Studies

Rajeev Kinra (Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2008) is a cultural historian of early modern South Asia, with a special emphasis on the literary, intellectual, religious, and political cultures of the Mughal and early British Empires in India (~16th-19th centuries). His research draws on several linguistic traditions (especially Persian, but also Hindi-Urdu and Sanskrit), to examine diverse modes of civility, tolerance, cosmopolitanism, and cultural modernity across the Indo-Persian and Indian Ocean worlds.

Cristina Lafont

Cristina Lafont

Harold H. and Virginia Anderson Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

Contact: clafont@northwestern.edu

Current Research: Normative questions in political philosophy

Research Interests: Democracy and Citizen Participation; Global Governance; Human Rights; Religion and Politics

Cristina Lafont is the author of Democracy without Shortcuts (Oxford University Press, forthcoming), Global Governance and Human Rights (Spinoza Lecture Series, van Gorcum, 2012), The Linguistic Turn in Hermeneutic Philosophy (MIT Press, 1999), Heidegger, Language, and World-disclosure (Cambridge University Press, 2000), and co-editor of Critical Theory in Critical Times: Transforming the Global Political and Economic Order (Columbia University Press, 2017) and The Habermas Handbook (Columbia University Press, 2017). She has also published numerous articles in contemporary moral and political philosophy.

Klaus Weber

Klaus Weber

Professor, Department of Management & Organizations, Kellogg School of Management

Contact: klausweber@kellogg.northwestern.edu

Current Research: Organizational structure from interaction: evidence from corporate sustainability efforts

Research Interests: Cultural and Institutional Theory; Sensemaking; Social Movements and Organizations; Environmental Sustainability; Globalization and Development

Klaus Weber is a Professor of Management & Organizations and serves as the deputy director of the Northwestern Buffett Institute for Global Affairs. He is also affiliated with the Department of Sociology and the Northwestern Institute for Sustainability and Energy. His research is grounded in cultural and institutional analysis, with substantive interests in the intersection between social movements, organizations and markets; economic globalization; and environmental sustainability. Weber received his PhD from the University of Michigan and joined the Kellogg faculty in 2003.